Tully Castle

On Tully Point, overlooking Lough Erne, the impressive remains of a fortified house, surviving almost to its full height of 2½ – storeys, and a bawn (defended enclosure) with four rectangular flankers (projecting corner towers, providing flanking fire along walls as well as forward). First documented in 1619, shortly after being built for the Hume family, who lived there until 1641, when it was captured and burned by the Maguire’s and never re-occupied.

The stronghouse, of two storeys with attics, has a typically Scottish T-shaped plan with a square wing projecting from the centre of the south side containing the entrance and a former scale-and-platt timber stair. The hall and parlour lay on the first floor, while the attics above contained the bedrooms, approached by a spiral stair in a Scottish-style quarter-round turret projection. The ground floor consists of a large barrel-vaulted chamber used as the kitchen and store- it has a huge fireplace and cooking recesses, but there are no windows, so light must have been provided by the fire and hanging lanterns.

A ten-year programme of repair followed the acquisition of the castle by the Department of Environment in 1974. Excavation revealed that the bawn was divided up by cobbled paths suggesting the use of this area as a garden. In 1988 formal beds were created within these paths using plants known in Ireland during the seventeenth century.

Access: Visitor centre, garden and bawn are wheelchair accessible. Footpath from car-park to Visitor centre and castle. Original paving and cobbled paths within the garden and bawn. Castle interior is not accessible to wheelchair users.

Steep path and steps from jetty to castle may be inaccessible for wheelchair users and difficult for those with walking difficulties.

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